European Illustrations of Native Americans

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A cheiff Ladye of Pomeiooc. VIII.
An Indigenous woman, a chief, is pictured standing on the bank of a river. Her hair is knotted at the nape of her neck, she wears several strands of beads around her neck, and her right wrist is cradled in the beads. She wears a fringed skirt around her waist and is topless and shoeless. She holds a large pot/container in her left hand. Beside her is a child, nude except for two strands of beads around their neck. The child holds a doll dressed like an English lady in one hand, and an object similar to a rattle in the other. Behind the pair, other Indigenous people are seen in canoes.
A cheiff Lorde of Roanoac. VII.
An Indigenous man, a chief, is pictured from the front and from behind standing on the bank of a river. A section of his hair is feathered in the middle of his head from his forehead to the nape of his neck, where the rest of his hair is gathered in a knot. He wears beaded earrings, a necklace with a large square pendant, and beaded bracelets around his wrists. He wears a fringed skirt draped around his waist and is barefoot and shirtless. In the background, other Indigenous people are seen in canoes, and there is a fishing apparatus in the water in the left part of the background.
A weroan or great Lorde of Virginia. III.
An Indigenous male is pictured standing on a hill, from the front and from behind. He wears beaded necklaces, beads around his left wrist and a cuff/wrist guard on his right, and fabric in the fasion of a fringed skirt tied around his waist. He is barefoot and shirtless, carries a longbow, and wears a quiver of arrows around his waist. In the background behind him there is a group of Indigenous people also holding longbows, and four people hunt deer. A forest is visible in the background.
A younge gentill woeman doughter of Secota. VI.
A young Indigenous woman stands on the bank of a river, shown from the front and from behind. Her hair is knotted at the nape of her neck. She wears a necklace of beads, and has an adornment, either a physical cuff or an inked design, around her biceps, her wrists, and her calves. She wears a fringed skirt tied around her waist and is barefoot and shirtless. In the river behind her, other Indigenous people are shown in canoes, and on the opposite bank there are several buildings.
Abord des Anglois en Virginia. II.
Two English ships are pictured sailing near the coast of Virginia (what is known today as the Outer Banks of North Carolina). One smaller ship is pictured within the outer islands, closer to the coast. Several Indigenous towns are labelled.
Aegros curandi ratio. XX.
The sick lie on elevated beds made of wooden slats with woven mats laid on top. One lies on their stomach with their head hanging over the side of the bed and their face close to steam coming out of a pan on the ground. The other lies on their back being tended to by other individuals. There is a fire between the beds and two jugs on the ground. Children play between the beds, and a woman breastfeeds nearby. In the background, a man smokes from a long pipe.
An ageed manne in his winter garment. IX.
An old man stands on a hilltop. He wears a fringed garment draped around his body and over one shoulder. His hair is spiked down the middle of his head from forehead to nape of neck, where it is gathered into a knot. On his feet are slippers. Behind him on the ground below the hill, cultivated fields surround a village – a small group of dwellings with a fence around them.
Arcis Carolinae delineatio. X.
A fort, in the process of being built, is shown. The fort is situated on an island in the middle of a river and is triangular. A bridge on one side connects the island to the opposite riverbank. The front of the fort has a high wooden wall, and just inside the walls a trench runs all the way around the perimeter. Within the fort are cannons and various buildings. According to the caption, this is a depiction of Fort Caroline.
Auri legendi ratio in rivis è montibus Apalatcy decurrentibus. XLI.
A group of Indigenous men is shown working in a river. They use long poles to stir up the mud at the bottom of the river and along the riverbanks. They put the collected gold into baskets. Two men are carrying baskets on their shoulders away from the river.
Bellum denunciandi ratio. XXXIII.
Five Indigenous men are shown. They are in the process of burying arrows, tip down in the ground with the shaft and fletching showing, around the outside of a village.
Ceremoniae in Regis & Sacerdotum funere observatae. XL.
A large group of Indigenous people are shown clustered in a circle, most kneel or sit on the ground. The group appears to be openly mourning together. At the center of the circle there is a mound of earth surrounded by arrows planted tip first into the ground. A large shell sits on top of the ground. The ceremony is taking place outside the village close to the log fence encircling the village.
Ceremoniae à Saturioua in expeditionem adversus hostes profecturo, observatae. XI.
A group of Indigenous people is shown. Most kneel on the ground in a semi-circle, and hold various weapons including bows and arrows and spears. They all wear headdresses, some in the shape of birds or mammals, and some with feathers on top. In the center of the semi-circle one man stands. He is covered in tattoos and holds his arms above his head. In one hand he holds a vessel of liquid. He wears a loincloth with a racoon tail hanging from the rear and a headdress with feathers. Behind him a spear and shield and two containers rest on the ground, and a fire burns.

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