European Illustrations of Native Americans

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Mulierum, quarum mariti vel in bello caesi, aut morbo sublati postulata à Rege. XVIII.
A group of Indigenous women crouch close to the ground with their hands covering their faces, in front of the chief. The chief wears a headdress with a large feather and animal tail hanging from the back, a round plate against his chest, a loincloth with small ovals hanging from it, and jewelry featuring the same small ovals around his upper arms and below his knees. His body is covered in designs, and he gazes down at the woman. In the background, a group of settlers stand together holding rifles. To the left of the group, a group of Indigenous men stand holding bows and arrows and clubs.
Noble Dame de Pomeioock. VIII.
An Indigenous woman, a chief, is pictured standing on the bank of a river. Her hair is knotted at the nape of her neck, she wears several strands of beads around her neck, and her right wrist is cradled in the beads. She wears a fringed skirt around her waist and is topless and shoeless. She holds a large pot/container in her left hand. Beside her is a child, nude except for two strands of beads around their neck. The child holds a doll dressed like an English lady in one hand, and an object similar to a rattle in the other. Behind the pair, other Indigenous people are seen in canoes.
On of the Religeous men in the towne of Secota. V.
An Indigenous man (a shaman/priest/religious man) is shown standing on the bank of a river, from the front and from behind. He wears a cape-like garment, is barefoot, and wears no other adornment. In the river behind him, other Indigenous people are shown in canoes.
On of the chieff Ladyes of Secota. IIII.
An Indigenous woman is pictured standing on the bank of a river, from the front and from behind. She wears cuffs on her upper biceps and forearms, and on her calves. Her clothing consists of a fringed skirt tied around her waist, she is barefoot and shirtless. In the background behind her, other Indigenous people can be seen in canoes and fishing in the river. On the opposite bank of the river there is a forest.
Oppidorum apud Floridenses structura. XXX.
An Indigenous town is shown. The town is surrounded by large logs stuck into the ground, forming a large fence with one entrance. At both the exterior and interior of the gap there is a tall hut. Inside the fence, many round structures sit in a cluster. At the center of the cluster is a larger rectangular building.
Outina Gallorum auxilio Potanou suum hostem superat. XIII.
A battle is shown between two groups of Indigenous people. The groups are armed with bows and arrows, clubs, and spears. The group on the left stands in a square formation with a gap in the middle. The French colonists fight on the side of Chief Outina (pictured in the middle of the group on the left). In the foreground, colonists shoot at Indigenous men on the opposing side with rifles.
Outina adversus hostem exercitum ducens, de eventu Magum consulit. XII.
Two Indigenous men are shown in the foreground. One is on his knees on top of a disc on the ground, which is surrounded by symbols in the dirt. His upper body is twisted, bent at the midriff with his arms unnaturally stuck out behind him. The other man kneels beside him and watches him. This man has tattoos all over his body, he holds a wooden staff, and around his neck hangs a decorative plate. In the background a large group of Indigenous people stand and watch the two men. They all hold various weapons, including bows and arrows and clubs. To the right stands a group of colonists.
Outinae in bellum proficiscentis militaris disciplina. XIIII.
Three Indigenous men stand in the foreground. All three carry a different weapon: the one on the left a spear, on the right a club, and in the middle a bow and arrow. They each wear a different headdress as well, the one on the left a small mammal and feathers, on the right a bird, and in the middle feathers. All three men wear round plates hanging from their necks, loincloths with tails hanging from the rear, and various adornments including earrings, bracelets above their elbows, around their wrists and below their knees, and the two men on the left are painted or tattooed. In the background a large group of Indigenous people stand in a battle formation, al holding spears. In the center of the formation there is a square of empty space, where another man stands.
Outinae milites ut caesis hostibus utantur. XV.
This image shows members of the Indigenous group led by Outina dismembering and scalping the deceased bodies of other Indigenous people from an “enemy” group.
Petri Gambie Galli cædes. XLII.
Three men are shown in a dugout canoe. An Indigenous man in the front of the canoe uses a long pole to maneuverer the boat in the river. Another Indigenous man stands in the rear of the canoe, looming over a colonist who kneels in the center of the boat (according to the title, he is a Frenchman named Pierre Gamble). The Indigenous man holds a small axe raised over the colonist’s head. A fire burns in the center of the boat, in front of the colonist.
Pisces, ferinam, reliquam annonam ustulandi ratio. XXIIII.
A tall rack is shown built over a large fire. The rack is composed of four upright logs with forks in the top ends. Two smaller logs are stretched between each pair of upright logs, and multiple small logs are stretched across those, forming a grill. Fish and small game, including a lizard, snake, and small deer are laid on top of the grill. Beside the rack are two Indigenous men. One kneels and fans the flams under the rack while the other holds a small animal.
Prestre de Secota. V.
An Indigenous man (a shaman/priest/religious man) is shown standing on the bank of a river, from the front and from behind. He wears a cape-like garment, is barefoot, and wears no other adornment. In the river behind him, other Indigenous people are shown in canoes.

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