European Illustrations of Native Americans

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Primogeniti solennibus ceremonijs Regi sacrificantur. XXXIIII.
In the foreground, an Indigenous man sits on a wooden bench with a colonist. The Indigenous man wears feathers in his hair, strands of beads around his neck, elbows, wrists, knees, and ankles. His body is covered in tattooed or painted designs. In the background, a large circle of women dances. One woman holds a child aloft in the center of the circle. Another woman kneels on the ground beside a large block with her hands over her head. Several Indigenous men watch the women dance.
Qua pompa Regina delecta Regem deseratur. XXXVII.
The chosen queen is carried on a litter by four men. Her body is decorated with paint or tattoos, and she wears strands of beads around her neck, arms and legs. Several men in front of the procession play large instruments, and a man walks on either side of the litter each waving a fan beside the queen. Behind the procession several women and men, the women carrying baskets and the men spears.
Qua ratione Floridenses de seriis rebus deliberant. XXIX.
A group of Indigenous people is shown. Several men sit on wooden benches that are arranged in a semi-circle. Two men hold large shells, and two appear to be vomiting onto the ground. Three women tend to large pots on the right. To the left of the women, and individual stands with their arms outstretched. In the foreground, a group of colonists stand holding rifles.
Qua solennitate Regina à Rege excipiatur. XXXVIII.
The king and queen sit on wooden chairs, elevated above the ground on a platform of logs. Groups of men sit on benches set perpendicular to the left and right sides of the platform. A group of women dance in a circle, inside the three-sided rectangle formed by the platform and benches. Some of the women hold hands as they dance. They wear ropes tied around their waists, from which discs hang.
Regis & Reginae prodeambulatio recreandi animi gratia. XXXVIX.
The king wears a robe tied at one shoulder and draping around his body and under his opposite arm. He wears several strands of beads draped from his other shoulder across his body, as well as around his arms and legs. In one hand he holds a staff with feathers at the top end. A man stands behind him and holds the end of the robe. Two other men stand beside the king waving long fans around him. A woman – perhaps the queen – stands slightly behind the king, and wears a garment draped from one shoulder around her body. Several women stand behind the group - one holds a basket and the others hold handfuls of leaves or herbs.
Sex alia flumina à Gallis observata. IIII.
Two large ships are shown anchored off the coast, and two smaller rowing boats full of colonists approach the shore. Each boat is heading towards the mouth of a different river. Four rivers are shown.
The Coniuerer. XI.
An Indigenous man, called a conjurer by the author, is shown standing on the bank of a river. He wears a black bird in his short hair as a symbol of his position. His only clothing is a hide tied around his waist, and a satchel hangs at his side. Behind him, other Indigenous people are seen in a canoe, hunting water birds with a bow and arrow.
The Marckes of sundrye of the Chief mene of Virginia. XXIII.
An Indigenous man is shown from behind. He holds a longbow in his right hand and two arrows in his left, and a quiver of arrows is tied around his waist. Drawn around him are seven designs that are labelled with the letters A to G. Design A is comprised of four arrows side by side pointing upwards, with the sizes decreasing from right to left. Design B has an arrow pointing upwards with a stylized ‘X’ to the left of the arrowhead. Design C has two arrows side by side pointing upwards in decreasing size from right to left. Design D has three arrows of the same size side by side pointing to the left. Design E is a stylized ‘X’. Design F is a crosshatch pattern. Design G is a singe arrow pointing upwards. The man has design F on the back of his left shoulder, suggesting that the designs are common tattoo/scarification art.
The arriual of the Englishemen in Virginia. II.
Two English ships are pictured sailing near the coast of Virginia (what is known today as the Outer Banks of North Carolina). One smaller ship is pictured within the outer islands, closer to the coast. Several Indigenous towns are labelled.
The brovvyllinge of their fishe over the flame. XIIII.
Two Indigenous men are shown cooking fish over a fire. Two fish are laid out on a rack over the flames, two others are propped up with sticks tail-down on the ground by the fire. The rack is composed of four forked sticks propped vertically on the ground, with four others forming a square horizontal to the ground, and five more laid across the the square forming a rack. One of the men holds a forked stick, the other carries a basket of fish slung across his back. Both men wear fringed garments tied around their waists and have a single feather in their hair.
The manner of makinge their boates. XII.
Indigenous men are shown in the process of making a canoe. The canoe they are working on is propped up on log braces. One of the men fans a fire inside the middle of the canoe while the other man scrapes the inside of one end of the canoe. In the background two other men are pictured tending to fires beside a large fallen tree, one at the base and one amongst the branches further up the trunk. There is also a fire at the base of another large tree in the background.
The truue picture of a man of nation neigbour unto the Picte IIII.
An Indigenous man is shown from the front. He carries a spear with a ball on the end in his right hand. He wears a belted tunic, and both a round shield and a sword with a curved blade hangs from the belt around his waist. This man is described as belonging to an Indigenous group that lived near the Picts. The Picts were an Indigenous group who lived in Britain long before the author’s time. Images of Picts were included in this book so that readers could compare their customs to those of the Indigenous people living in Virginia.

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