European Illustrations of Native Americans

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The truue picture of a vvomen Picte II.
An Indigenous woman is shown from the front. She carries a spear in her left hand and two in her right. Her hair is long, she wears a twisted cord around her neck, and a sword with a curved blade hangs from another cord around her waist. She is nude, and her body is covered in painted designs. The Picts were an Indigenous group who lived in Britain long before the author’s time. Images of Picts were included in this book so that readers could compare their customs to those of the Indigenous people living in Virginia.
The truue picture of a vvomen nigbour to the Picte V.
An Indigenous woman is shown from the front. She carries a spear with a ball on the end in her right hand. She wears a belted tunic that is open chested and laces under the breasts. A sword with a curved blade hangs from the belt around her waist. This woman is described as belonging to an Indigenous group that lived near the Picts. The Picts were an Indigenous group who lived in Britain long before the author’s time. Images of Picts were included in this book so that readers could compare their customs to those of the Indigenous people living in Virginia.
The truue picture of a yonge dowgter of the Pictes III.
A young Indigenous woman is shown from the front. She carries a spear in her left hand. Her hair is long, she wears a twisted cord around her neck, and a sword with a curved blade hangs another cord around her waist. She is nude, and her body is covered in painted designs. The Picts were an Indigenous group who lived in Britain long before the author’s time. Images of Picts were included in this book so that readers could compare their customs to those of the Indigenous people living in Virginia.
The truue picture of one Picte I.
An Indigenous man is shown from the front. He carries a shield strapped to his left forearm and a long spear in his right hand. Also in his right hand is a severed human head, another head lays on the ground at his feet. His hair is long, he wears a twisted cord around his neck, and a sword with a curved blade hangs from another cord around his waist. He is nude, and his body is covered in painted designs. The Picts were an Indigenous group who lived in Britain long before the author’s time. Images of Picts were included in this book so that readers could compare their customs to those of the Indigenous people living in Virginia.
Their manner of careynge ther Childern and a tyere of the cheiffe Ladyes of the towne of Dasemonquepeuc. X.
An Indigenous woman is pictured from the front and from behind standing on the bank of a river. She wears a fringed skirt around her waist, her hair is unbound, and she is topless and shoeless. She holds a young child on her back, with the child’s left arm over her shoulder and their left hand in hers, and their right leg tucked under her right arm against her hip. Behind them, other Indigenous people are seen in canoes.
Their seetheynge of their meate in earthen pottes. XV.
An Indigenous man and woman cook food in a large earthen pot over a fire. The woman holds a ladle, and the man kneels on the ground and fans the flames under the pot. Inside the pot a fish is identifiable, amongst other foods. Both individuals wear a fringed garment tied around their waist, and the man has a single feather in his hair.
Their sitting at meate. XVI.
Two Indigenous people are shown sharing a meal. A man sits on the left, and a woman on the right. They sit on a mat on the ground. A large dish with food is between them, and around them are a jug, a pipe, some nuts, a fish, some cobs of corn, and other objects. The man wears a fringed garment draped around his body and over one shoulder and a single feather in his hair. The woman wears a similar fringed garment draped over one shoulder and two strands of beads around her neck.
Ther Idol Kivvasa. XXI.
An idol carved of wood is pictured. It is shaped like a human man in a seated position and sits inside a hut-like structure. The idol bears a hat, strands of beads around its neck, a fringed skirt around its waist, strands of beads around each of its thighs, and decorated cuffs around each of its calves.
Trophaeum & solennes ritus devictis hostibus. XVI.
A group of Indigenous people sit on the ground in a semi-circle. A man dances in the middle of the group. In the background, the body parts of the defeated enemies have been mounted on poles that have been stuck into the ground as trophies. In the foreground an Indigenous man stands with a few colonists.
Un des grands Seigneurs de Virginia. III.
An Indigenous male is pictured standing on a hill, from the front and from behind. He wears beaded necklaces, beads around his left wrist and a cuff/wrist guard on his right, and fabric in the fasion of a fringed skirt tied around his waist. He is barefoot and shirtless, carries a longbow, and wears a quiver of arrows around his waist. In the background behind him there is a group of Indigenous people also holding longbows, and four people hunt deer. A forest is visible in the background.
Une noble Dame de Secota. IIII.
An Indigenous woman is pictured standing on the bank of a river, from the front and from behind. She wears cuffs on her upper biceps and forearms, and on her calves. Her clothing consists of a fringed skirt tied around her waist, she is barefoot and shirtless. In the background behind her, other Indigenous people can be seen in canoes and fishing in the river. On the opposite bank of the river there is a forest.
XIII. Their manner of fishynge in Virginia.
Four Indigenous people are shown in a canoe on the river. The person in the right end of the canoe fishes with a net on the end of a long stick, while the person in the left of the canoe appears to paddle. There are two individuals in the middle of the canoe sitting on either side of a fire. In the background several other Indigenous people fish in the shallows of the river on foot and in canoes using spears.

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