Latin American Chronicles

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Abril Camai Inca Raimi Quilla
This chapter is dedicated to discussing the traditions and rituals of each month during the Inca Empire. The Incas tracked the months and years through the stars and their months consisted of thirty days. This image depicts the month of April, which was dedicated to the festival of the Inca. The month of April provided ripe crops which allowed them to have a great feast. The author explains that the Inca Emperor would invite lords, chiefs and the common people to the festival, where they would play games, sing and enjoy entertainment. This image depicts the festivities as the Inca Emperor is looking up to the sun as he sings while two women stand behind him playing musical instruments. The caption at the bottom of the image reads “fiesta del ynga” which translates to “festival of the Inca.”
Abvciones Agveros Atitapia Acoiraqvi
This busy image depicts many omens that were considered evil in the Inca Empire. These omens were believed to bring misfortune or death. A snake is depicted at the bottom of the image with the words “machacuay acoyraqui puromanca cay uacichic” [serpent of misfortune our house will be destroyed] written along the length of the snake. Above the snake is a fox looking to the left with a caption written on its body that reads “El zorro arrastra al demonio, arrastra a su creador” [the fox drags the demon, drags his creator]. Above the fox is a large insect and the caption above it reads “nina nina curucta ayzaycuuan, uarmi uanonca” [a large insect has brought a worm, my wife will die]. A butterfly is illustrated above the insect. There is a caption above the butterfly that reads “tapacuy yaycuan uanazacmi” [a butterfly approached]. There is a tree on the right side of the image with a chusic [owl] at the top of the tree, then a tuco [horned owl] in the middle, with a pacpac [pymgy owl] to the top right of the pygmy owl, then a chicollo [bird], and the last branch depicts a pecpe [small bird]. The man in the centre of the image has a frightened expression on his face, and the caption beside him reads “astaya uanozacmi” [bad luck, I will die].
Administrador de Provincias Svivioc Gvaiac Poma Apo Senor
This chapter discusses the system of administrative officials in the Inca Empire. This image depicts a suyuyoc [provincial administrator] named Carua Poma, son of Capac Apo Guayac Poma. He is illustrated standing in the centre of the image holding two quipus [a device for recording information]. The author explains that these officials were sons of noble lineage and were chosen for this position to learn about accounting, administration, and governing. These officials were required to oversee communities and their fields and sacrifices and ensure everything was accounted for.
Agosto Chacra Iapvi Quilla
This chapter is dedicated to discussing the traditions and rituals of each month during the Inca Empire. The Incas tracked the months and years through the stars and their months consisted of thirty days. This image depicts the month of August which was dedicated to plowing fields for agriculture. This image depicts a row of men shoveling to prepare the ground to sow in their seeds. There is an old woman on the right side of the image carrying a cup and there are women on the left side of the image looking at the men shoveling. The caption at the bottom of the image reads “tienpo de labransa hayllinmi ynca,” which translates to “time for plowing, Inca farmer’s dance.”
Algvazil Maior, Chacnai Camaioc, Lvurin Cvzco
This chapter discusses the system of administrative officials in the Inca Empire. This image depicts a young law enforcement official who is illustrated holding a stick that carries a chuspa [small bag] and ojotas [sandals]. These two items were used as a form of identification. These two items were used as a form of identification while enforcing law and justice in the kingdom. This official’s title was uatay camayoc [major constable].
Amojonadores Deste Reino, Vna Cavcho Inga, Cona Raqvi Inga
This chapter discusses the system of administrative officials in the Inca Empire. This image depicts two men named Una Caucho Inca and Conaraqui Inca establishing boundary markers within the Inca Empire. By order of the Inca king, Topa Inca Yupanqui, these men were tasked with creating ditches and landmarks to mark the borders of the territories and provinces in the empire. Both men in this image are illustrated working hard by placing bricks on a boundary marker which appears to be a walled structure. There is another territory marker in the background of the image surrounded by the Andes.
Andas Del Inga Pillco Ranpa
This chapter is dedicated to discussing the Inca and his life. This image depicts the Inca king, Huayna Capac, standing as he is being carried on his litter into battle. There are four figures carrying him on his litter with two people in the front and two people in the back with the wooden posts resting on their shoulders. The Inca is illustrated wearing a helmet and carrying a sword and shield as he goes into battle. The caption at the top of the image reads “Guayna Capac Ynga ua a la conquista de los Cayanbis Guanca Bilca Canari Ciccho Chachapoya Quito Lataconga” [Huayna Capac Inca goes to conquer the provinces of Cayambe, Huancavilca, Canari, Ciccho, Chacapoya, Quito, Lataconga]. The caption located below the litter reads “Lleuan los yndios Andamarcas y Soras Lucanas Parinacochas a la guerra y batalla de priesa lo lleuan” [The Inca took soldiers from the provinces of Andamarca, Sora, Lucana and Parinacocha to do battle].
Andas Del Inga Qvispi Ranpa
This chapter is dedicated to discussing the Inca and his life. This illustration depicts the Inca king sitting in a litter which is being carried by two people in the front and two people at the back. The litter is decorated with tassels hanging from a roof made of leaves. The Inca king is sitting on the left side of the litter and he is identified as Topa Inca Yupanqui. His coya [queen] is sitting on the right side of the litter and she is identified as Mama Ocllo Coya. The caption written below the litter reads “llevan al ynga los yndios callauaya espacio a pasearse” [the Callahuaya carry the Inca slowly on a ride].
Apostol San Bartolome
This illustration depicts the apostle Saint Bartholomew performing a conversion and baptism to an indigenous Peruvian named Anti, whose baptismal name became Anti Waricocha. Saint Bartholomew also places the holy cross of Carabuco in the province of Callao. The words “santa crus de carabuco” are written at the top of the cross to identify it. Anti Waricocha is depicted kneeling on the right side of the engraving looking up to Saint Bartholomew. The words “anti uira cocha colla fue bautizado este yndio” are written above Anti’s head, which translates to “Anti Waricocha from Callo, this Indian was baptized.” A note at the very bottom of the image reads “de 1570 años de la santa cruz” which tells us that this event happened 1,570 years ago at the time of publication.
Canciones I Mvcica Aravi Pincollo Vanca
This chapter is dedicated to discussing the various celebrations and festivals that would be held in the Inca Empire. This image reflects the importance of music and songs. There are two boys illustrated on the left side of the image sitting on a hill with straw or wheat bales strapped to their backs. They are depicted playing flutes. The author explains that boy’s flute songs were called “pincollona.” The girls on the right side of the image are depicted nude in a river as they look and point at the boys playing their flutes. The author explains that girl’s songs are called “uanca.”
Capitvlo De Los Idolos Vaca Billca Incap
This chapter is dedicated to describing the idols and gods of the Incas. This image depicts the Inca Emperor, Topa Inca, speaking to local huacas [deities] on the uana cauri [Huanacauri] mountain. Topa Inca is depicted on the right side of the image wearing his royal garb and his name is written by his head to identify him. The idols are arranged in a circle at the base of the mountain. There are words on the image which is the dialogue spoken between the Inca and the idols. The dialogue written in front of the Inca reads “uaca bilcacona - pim camcunamanta ama parachun cazachun runtochun ninqui rimari chaylla,” which translates to “deities, who among you has said for it not to rain, not to freeze, not to hail? Speak, that is all." The dialogue written in the circle of the idols reads “manam nocacunaca ynca,” which translates to “it was not us, Inca.” The writing below the circle of the idols is a caption for the image which reads “contodas las uacas habla el ynga.” This translates to “the Inca speaks to all the idols.”
Capitvlo Primera Calle Vecita General Avca Camaioc
The author explains that there were ten paths for men to follow in the Inca Empire based on age division. The first path is of the auca camayoc [master of war], brave warriors who entered their service at twenty-five years old and ended at fifty years old and fought for the emperor. The man depicted in the image is labelled as auca camayoc. There are words written at the bottom right side of the image which reads “de edad de treynta y tres anos” which translates to “thirty-three years old.” The words written in the bottom left corner of the image reads “balente moso yndio tributario” which translates to “brave young Indian tributary.” The young man depicted in the image is illustrated holding a decapitated head of an enemy in his right hand and a shield in his left.

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