Latin American Chronicles

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Qvinta Calle Cipascona
The author explains that there were ten paths for women to follow in the Inca Empire based on age division. This group was called sipsacona [pretty young women]. These women were thirty-three years old and were deemed to be at a marriageable age. The author explains that no man could marry these women without their personal consent. A young woman with long hair is depicted standing in the centre of the image as she spins yarn. The caption on the image reads “de edad de treynta y tres años, donzelas para casar y acudan a la comunidad y sapci,” which translates to “thirty-three years old, maidens of marriageable age and aid the community and sapsi.”
Qvinto Calle Saiapaiac
The author explains that there were ten paths for men to follow in the Inca Empire based on age division. This fifth group was called the sayapayac [helper]. They were young men aged eighteen to twenty years old who would serve as cachacuna wayna [messenger boys] between nearby towns. The author explains that they would also herd farm animals and aided warriors in battle. The young man depicted in the image is illustrated running with a message in his hand to demonstrate his messenger duties. The message has the word “carta” written on it which translates to “letter.” The caption at the bottom of the image reads “de edad de dies y ocho años yndio de medio tributo mozeton” which translates to “eighteen years old, Indian who pays half tribute, strapping youth.”
San Geronimo Papa Damazo
Pope Damasus is illustrated on the right side of the image wearing pontifical attire. He is also holding a staff which has three horizontal bars at the top, which symbolizes his power as Pontiff. Saint Jerome is on the left side on the image pointing to Pope Damasus. Pope Damasus, at the request of Saint Peter, is pictured writing down the history of the papacy. The words “ruega san geronimo cardenal” are written above Saint Jerome’s head, which translates to “the cardinal Saint Jerome.” The pope’s name is written above his head to identify him. The words “en Roma” are written at the bottom of the image to identify that the location is in Rome.
Secretario Del Inga I Conzejo, Incap Qvipocnin Capac Apoconap Camachicvinin Qvipoc
This chapter discusses the system of administrative officials in the Inca Empire. The official depicted in the image is Lliuyac Poma and he acted as a quipu accountant and secretary to the Inca. They would keep records of everything that happened within the kingdom through their quipus (a threaded device used to record information by knotting the threads in different ways). Lliuyac Poma is depicted in this image holding a quipu with both of his hands. The caption at the bottom of the image reads “secretario” [secretary].
Segunda Edad de Indios Vari Rvna
This illustration depicts the second age of the indigenous people of Peru, who the author calls the Wari Runa. The author stresses that these people are different than their ancestors as they began to build stone huts as opposed to living in caves and under cliffs. Therefore, there is a depiction of a small stone hut house in the image. The word “pucullo” is written on the house, which translates to “small house.” There is a man pictured kneeling with his hands together in prayer and looking up to the sky. There are words above his head which read “pacha camac maypim canqui,” which translates to “where are you father?” There are words at the bottom of the image by the man’s feet which reads, “en este reyno de las Yndias” and that translates to “in this kingdom of the Indians.”
Segvnda Arma: Las Armas
This image depicts the second coat of arms of the Incas. There is a bird in the top left corner with the words “Curi Quinquitica” written above it. This translates to “golden hummingbird.” The top right corner depicts a jaguar behind a palm tree. The bottom left corner depicts a tassel and has the words “Masca Paycha” written above it, which translates to “royal tassel.” The bottom right hand corner depicts two snakes with tassels in their mouths. The words “amaro ynga” are written above the snakes, which translates to “Inca snakes.” The very bottom of the image reads, “armas reales del reyno de las yndias de los reys yngas” which translates to “royal arms of the kingdom of the Indies of the Inca Kings.”
Segvnda Calle Paiacona
The author explains that there were ten paths for women to follow in the Inca Empire based on age division. This second group was called the payacona [old women]. These were women who were fifty years old who weaved clothing for the common people. The woman in the image is depicted kneeling as she weaves at a loom which is strapped around her back. The caption written on the image reads “de edad de cincuenta años muger que cirue al prencipal,” which translates to “fifty-years old, woman who serves the nobles.”
Segvnda Calle Pvrec Macho
The author explains that there were ten paths for men to follow in the Inca Empire based on age division. This second path is called the puric macho [old man who walks], which was for people who are over the age of sixty and are exempt from military services. Their duties included working in fields and carrying straw and firewood. This image depicts an older man walking with a load of wood strapped over his back and a dog walking by his feet. The caption at the bottom of the image reads “de edad de sesenta años pasado de tributo que cirue a los principales” which translates to “sixty years old, exempt from tribute one who serves the nobles.”
Segvnda Señora Capac Mallqvima
This illustration depicts the second lady of the region Antisuyu in the Inca Empire. Her name was Capac Mallquima. The words “ande suyo” are written at the bottom of the image to identify Antisuyu as the region the image takes place in. The author explains that Capac Mallquima and her people wore limited clothing which is why she is depicted partially nude. There is a small child depicted in the bottom left-hand corner of the image looking up at Capac Mallquima as she hands him something. There is a large bird depicted in the bottom right-hand corner of the image.
Segvndo Inga Cinche Roca Inga
This image depicts the second Inca, Cinche Roca. He is depicted wearing a traditional feathered head visor, a long cloak, and his shirt has three embroidered stripes in the centre. He is holding a mantle in his right hand and a shield in his left. The words “conquisto hasta hatun colla ariquipa” are written in the bottom left corner of the image, which translates to “he conquered up to Hatun Colla, Arequipa.” The author mentions that Cinche Roca had killed the first legitimate Inca, Tocay Capac-Pinau, and governed the city of Cusco. The author claims that Cinche Roca died when he was 155 years old.
Sesta Calle Coro Tasqve
The author explains that there were ten paths for women to follow in the Inca Empire based on age division. This group was called coro tasque [short-haired young girls]. These women were aged from twelve to eighteen years old. Their duties included serving their parents and noble women, learning to spin and weave, and herding livestock. The young girl in the image is depicted with short hair, herding llamas, carrying firewood on her back while also spinning yarn. A small dog is walking by her feet. The caption on the image reads “de edad de doze años, ciruan a su padre y a la comunidad,” which translates to “twelve years old, they serve their father and the community.”
Setienbre Coia Raimi Quilla
This chapter is dedicated to discussing the traditions and rituals of each month during the Inca Empire. The Incas tracked the months and years through the stars and their months consisted of thirty days. This image depicts the month of September, which was dedicated to holding a festival as a celebration of fertility and growth. The festival was dedicated to the Moon, which was the wife of the Sun. The author explains that the Inca Emperor ordered that sickness and disease to be banished in the kingdom during this time. To keep things clean and avoid sickness, warriors would walk with torches throughout cities and clean houses and the streets. There are three warriors depicted walking in this image with shields in their left hand and torches raised in their right as they walk towards a city to clean it. The Moon is depicted in the top left corner of the image. The caption at the bottom of the image reads “la fiesta solene de la coya la rreyna,” which translates to “the solemn festival of the coya the queen.”

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