Latin American Chronicles

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El Qvinto Capitan Avqvi Topa Inga Ivpanqvi
This illustration depicts the fourth captain, Auqui Topa Inca Yupanqui. These captains were a level of Inca authority who helped lead the conquest of the Andes. This captain was the son of Capac Yupanqui, the fifth king of the Inca Empire. This image depicts the captain kneeling on the right side of the image as he presents a decapitated head of an enemy to his father. The king is depicted standing on the left side of the image looking down at his son as he holds a staff in one hand and pointing to the decapitated head with the other. His name is written beside his head to identify him. The words “hasta quichiua aymara” are written below the king’s feet, which translates to “until Quechua Aymara.” This refers to the captain’s conquest of the provinces of the Quechua and Aymara speaking people.
El Qvinto Inga Capac Ivpanqve
This illustration depicts the fifth king of the Inca Empire, Capac Yupanqui. He is depicted wearing a feathered visor on his head and holding a shield with his left hand. The author explains that this king discovered many mines of gold, silver and mercury, and told demons where these mines were. There is a flying creature in the sky above Capac Yupanqui which has wings, horns and a tail, which is assumed to be the demon that the king relayed information to as Capac Yupanqui is looking up at the creature and they are both holding cups. The words at the bottom of the image read, “Reynó hasta la prouincia de Aymara, Quichiua” which translates to “King to the province of Aymara, Quechua.” The Aymara were and are an indigenous nation in the Andes.
El Qvinze Capitan Mallco Mvllo
This image depicts the fifteenth captain, Mallco Mullo. These captains were a level of Inca authority who helped lead the conquest of the Andes. The captain is depicted standing in the centre of the image with a long spear in his right hand and a sword in his left hand. His shield is illustrated resting on the ground by his feet. The author explains that this captain helped conquer many regions for the emperor Huayna Capac. The word “condesuyo” is written beside his left foot. Condes was a region within the Inca Empire.
El Segundo Mundo De Noé
Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala has depicted a biblical story from the Book of Genesis in this illustration. This image depicts Noah and the Flood, with Noah illustrated in the centre of the image kneeling as he looks up and prays to God. Surrounding Noah are all the animals that he was instructed to bring on the Arc with him to avoid the flood. The name “Noé” is written above Noah’s head to identify him. The word “arca” is written just below the arc. There is a caption at the bottom of the image that reads, “Por mandado de Dios hinchió las aguas en el mundo y castigó” which translates to “By God's command he swelled the waters in the world and punished.”
El Segvndo Capitan Topa Amaro Inga
This illustration depicts the second Captain, Topa Amaro. These captains were a level of Inca authority who helped lead the conquest of the Andes. The author explains this captain was the son of Sinchi Roca, the second Inca king in the kingdom of Cusco. The author explains that this captain was violent and would torture and kill his enemies, which is why he is depicted gouging the eyes out of an enemy in this image. His enemy is depicted kneeling as he is being tortured by Topa Amaro. There is another Inca on the right side of the image holding the rope that the enemy is tied to. The word “collasuyo” is written at the bottom of the image, which was a southern region in the Inca Empire.
El Segvndo Mes Febrero Pavcar Varai Quilla
This chapter is dedicated to discussing the traditions and rituals of each month during the Inca Empire. The Incas tracked the months and years through the stars and their months consisted of thirty days. This image depicts the month of February, which was dedicated to wearing loincloths and sacrificing gold, silver, and llamas to their idols and Gods. The author explains that February was also a month of heavy rains, which is why there are clouds and rain drawn at the top of the image. There is a man kneeling in the image as he offers his sacrifice to his idol which is pictured atop a mountain on the left side of the image. The caption that describes the image is written written on the side of the mountain and it reads “sacrificio con oro y plata y lo rrecibe y mollo y cuui,” which translates to “sacrifice of gold and silver, and he receives it, and seashell and guinea pig.” The other caption at the bottom of the image reads “sacrificio con oro y plata abundancia,” which translates to “abundance of sacrifice in gold and silver.”
El Sesto Capitan Otorongo Achachi Apo Camac Inga
This illustration depicts the sixth captain, Otorongo Achachi who was also known as Apu Camac Inca. These captains were a level of Inca authority who helped lead the conquest of the Andes. This captain was the son of Inca Roca, the sixth king of the Inca Empire. The author explains that a lord had told this captain that in order to successfully conquer he must become an Otorongo [Jaguar]. This is why the author has illustrated a jaguar in this image. There is a person on the right-hand side with an arrow pointed at the jaguar. The words “ande suyo” are written at the bottom of the image which describes the regions that this captain had conquered.
El Sesto Inga, Inga Roca Con Sv Hijo
This illustration depicts the sixth king of the Inca Empire, Inca Roca. He is pictured looking down at his son and holding him with his right hand and holding a shield and ax in his left hand. The author describes him as a wide and long man. His son’s name is Guaman Capac Inca. There are words written at the bottom of the image which reads, “Reynó hasta Ande Suyo” which translates to “King up to the Andes region.”
El Setimo Capitan Inga Maitac
This illustration depicts the fourth captain, Maitac Inca. These captains were a level of Inca authority who helped lead the conquest of the Andes. This captain was the son of Yawar Waqaq, the seventh king of the Inca Empire. This captain is depicted on the right side of the image with his fellow Inca soldiers. They are illustrated fighting enemies that are on top of a fortress on the left side of the image. The name of the fortress, “pucara fortaleza,” is written on one of the stones to identify the fortress. The words “Andamarca y Lucana, Parinacochas, Soras, Poma Tanbos, Condes, Changas, Yungas” are also written on the stone which identifies the enemies. One of the soldiers on the right side of the image is holding a small figurine of an idol which is identified as “ydolo uarco.”
El Setimo Inga Iavar Vacac Inga
This illustration depicts the seventh king of the Inca Empire, Yahuar Huacac (or Yawar Waqaq). He is depicted holding a shield in his left hand and an ax in his right. He is pictured wearing traditional royal garb and a feathered head visor. The author explains that this Inca king began the tradition of fasting and penance and commanded his subjects to do so as well. There are words at the bottom of the image that reads, “Reynó Cullaua Conde, Ariquipa Conde, Cusco Conde, Parinacocha, Changas, Soras, Andamarca, Lucana,” which describes the cities that he ruled over.
El Terzero Capitan Cvci Van Chire
This image depicts the third captain, Cuci Uanan Chire. These captains were a level of Inca authority who helped lead the conquest of the Andes. He was the son of the third Inca king, Lloque Yupanqui Inca. The author explains that this captain had fought and conquered other Inca leaders. The captain is depicted standing on the left side of the image drinking from a cup in his right hand with another cup being held up with his left hand. His shield and axe are laying on the ground in front of him. There is a sun with a face in the top right corner of the image. The words “hasta tanbo inca” are written at the bottom of the image which translates to “to tambo inca.” This could be referring to the span of his conquests.
El Terzero Inga Lloqvi Ivpanqve Ynga
This illustration depicts the third Inca King, Lloque Yupanqui Inca. He is depicted holding a shield in his left hand and a long mantle in his right hand. His shirt has three embroidered striped in the centre of it. There are words written at the bottom of the image near his right foot which reads, “Reyno hasta Maras” which translates to “King until Maras”, which could suggest he was the king of a large area up until the town of Maras, which is near Cusco.

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