Latin American Chronicles

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El Terzero Mes Marzo Pacha Pvcvi Quilla
This chapter is dedicated to discussing the traditions and rituals of each month during the Inca Empire. The Incas tracked the months and years through the stars and their months consisted of thirty days. This image depicts the third month of March, which was dedicated to the sacrifice of black llamas to the idols of the Incas. A man is depicted kneeling in the image as he holds onto a llama which he is about to sacrifice before the idol resting on the hilltop. The author explains that this month was heavy in rain, which is why there are clouds and rainfall depicted at the top of the image. The caption on the image reads “sacrifica con este carnero negro,” which translates to “they sacrifice the black llama.”
El Treze Capitan Capac Apo Ninarva
This illustration depicts the thirteenth captain, Capac Apo Ninarua. These captains were a level of Inca authority who helped lead the conquest of the Andes. He is depicted holding a bow in his left hand and drawing an arrow with his right hand and depicted wearing a unique outfit. His shield is illustrated resting on the ground by his feet. The author explains that this captain aided the emperor Huayna Capac in conquering Quito.
Enterio de Colla Svios
This image depicts the burial traditions of the people in the Collasuyo region of the Inca Empire. The author explains that the deceased would be buried in fully clothed in an upright-seated position five days after their death. They would be given food and dinner ware for their burial. The deceased in this image is illustrated adorned in garments as they sit in an upright position in front of the ayan otapa [house of the dead]. The figures on the right side of the image are depicted drinking and making liquid offerings to the dead. The caption at the bottom of the image reads “enterrio” [burial].
Entiero de Anti Svios
This image depicts the burial traditions of the people in the Antisuyo region of the Inca Empire. The author explains that this group of people were cannibals and when a person died, they ate their flesh to the bone. When the skeleton was exposed, they brought the skeleton to uitaca [tree] and placed the body inside without having any ceremonies to celebrate the dead. The is one figure placing the skeleton inside the tree, and a female figure on the far-right side of the image depicted crying. The skeleton is labeled as aya [deceased], and the female figure is labeled as yquima [widow]. The caption at the bottom of the image reads “enterrio” [burial].
Entiero de Chinchai Svios
This image depicts the burial traditions of the people in the Chinchaysuyos region of the Inca Empire. The author explains that the burial would take place five days after the death and the citizens would hold a procession where they carry the body adorned in garments. The dead body is depicted being carried on a plank of wood over the shoulders of two men. The dead man’s yquima [widow] is illustrated looking at the ground, holding a stick as she cries for her husband. They are illustrated taking the body to the pucullo [tomb] on the left side of the image. There is a skeleton illustrated on the pucullo to demonstrate that it is a tomb. There is a caption at the top of the image which reads “aya defunto” [deceased] and a caption at the bottom which reads “enterrio” [burial].
Entiero de los Conde Svios
This image depicts the burial practices of the Condesuyo region in the Inca Empire. The author explains that the deceased would be adorned in garments and buried sitting upright. They would also put gold and silver in the mouths of the deceased. The deceased in the image is depicted sitting upright in front of the tomb labelled as amayanacan uptapnaca [town of the dead]. There is a skeleton to demonstrate that it is a tomb. The figures on the right are depicted crying and mourning the dead.
Fiesta De Los Chinchai Svio Vavco Taqvi Vacon
This chapter is dedicated to discussing the various celebrations and festivals that would be held in the Inca Empire. This image depicts a festival being held in the Chinchaysuyo region of the Inca Empire. There are four women illustrated in the image performing a uaucu taqui [song and dance]. The woman in the centre of the image and the woman on the right side of the image are depicted wearing feathered head garbs and blowing into what appears to be a musical instrument of sorts. The two women on the left side of the image are depicted playing a hand drum. The caption at the bottom of the image reads “guanoc pampa paucar pampa” [celebrations].
Fiesta De Los Colla Svios Havisca Mallco Capaca Colla
This chapter is dedicated to discussing the various celebrations and festivals that would be held in the Inca Empire. This image depicts the celebrations held in the Collasuyo region in the Inca Empire. There is a figure on the right side of the image playing a large drum hanging from a wooden post with a child standing beside them. There is a large crowd of people illustrated on the left side of the image taking part in the festivities. Some figures are illustrated with flutes in their mouths as they play music. There is a caption written under the drum which reads “colla pampa/sanchalli” [the plateau in that quarter/in Sanchalli].
Fiesta De Los Conde Svios Aia Milla Zainata
This chapter is dedicated to discussing the various celebrations and festivals that would be held in the Inca Empire. This image depicts the celebrations held in the Condesuyo region in the Inca Empire. There is a crowd of people on the right side of the image singing a song with the woman at the forefront holding and playing a drum. The three figures on the left side of the image are depicted wearing feathered clothing and a feathered head piece for the celebrations. They are also depicted wearing aya milla saynata [masks that resemble the dead]. There is a caption at the bottom of the image which identifies the location. “Coropona” was a peak between Arequipa and Ayacucho, which are both now modern cities in Peru.
Fiesta de Los Ingas Varicza Aravi Del Inga Canta Con Sv Pvca Llama
This chapter is dedicated to discussing the various celebrations and festivals that would be held in the Inca Empire. This image depicts a festival in which the Inca king would dance and sing for a reddish-brown llama. The llama is depicted on the left side of the image with a rope that’s wrapped around its head tied to a peg in the ground. The words “puca llama” [reddish-brown llama] are written on the neck of the llama. The letters “y-y” are written in front of the Inca’s mouth, which are the sounds he would sing to the llama. There is a crowd of people standing behind the Inca who are also participating in the festivities. The caption “haucay pata” [main square, Cusco] is written at the bottom of the image to identify the location.
Fiestas De Los Andi Svios Caia Caia Varmi Avca
This chapter is dedicated to discussing the various celebrations and festivals that would be held in the Inca Empire. This image depicts the music festivities celebrated by the people in the Antisuyo region of the Inca Empire. There are three figures depicted dancing in a circle holding hands, with the figure on the right playing a flute. There is a fourth figure in the background on the ride side of the image. They are depicted nude from the waist up. The author explains that the men would dress up as women during these celebrations.
Flota Colum en la mar a las yndias des piru
This illustration depicts the voyage of Columbus to the West Indies. The captain is depicted at the bow of the ship, with his name written above his head as “Juan Dias de Solis”, and the word “pilot” to identify his position. Beside the captain is Columbus, with his name written as, “colum.” The two captains of the embarkment, Don Diego de Almagro and Don Francisco Pizarro are illustrated in the centre of the ship holding flags. There is a man standing at the stern of the ship is identified as “Vasco Nunes de Ualboa.” There is an inscription below the ship which reads, “en la mar a las yndias cetecientas leguas” and translates to “over the southern sea to the Indies 700 leagues.”

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