Latin American Chronicles

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Governador De Los Caminos Reales, Capac Nan Tocricoc Anta Inga
This chapter discusses the system of administrative officials in the Inca Empire. This image depicts a scene in which a royal road inspector is being helped by an assistant to physically mark off distances in the road. The author explains that there were six royal roads in the Inca Empire, and they were always governed by an inspector. The inspector is depicted standing in the foreground of the image holding a walking stick in his left hand and pointing to his assistant with his right hand. His assistant is illustrated kneeling in the bottom left corner of the image and holding a stake which is used to determine the width of the roads. There are other royal roads depicted in the background of the image and are marked by large Inca stone structures. One of the roads is identified in the top left corner as “Chocllo Cocha nan.” There is a small structure at the bottom right corner and has a caption that reads “Bilcas Guaman Capac Nan” [royal road of Bilcas Guaman]. The caption at the bottom of the image outside of the border reads “uedor de los caminos” [of the road].
Governador De Los Pventes Deste Reino Chaca Svioioc Acos Inga, Gvambo Chaca
This chapter discusses the system of administrative officials in the Inca Empire. This image depicts an official overseeing the Huambo bridge. The author explains that all bridges within the Inca Empire were required to be overseen by an official. The man depicted in the image, Acos Inca, oversaw all the bridges. Acos Inca is illustrated standing on the left side of the image holding a stick in his right hand overlooking the Huambo bridge as a traveler walks across. The cable bridge is suspended over a long winding river surrounded by an Andean landscape. The caption at the bottom of the image reads “uedor de puentes” [of the bridges].
Hichezeros de Zvenos Llvlla Laica Vmu
This chapter is dedicated to discussing the sorcerers of the Inca Empire and their practices. This illustration depicts three different types of practicing sorcerers. There is a sorcerer depicted at the top of the image sleeping. The author explains that this type of sorcerer can communicate with demons during their sleep while they dream. There is a demon figure illustrated leaning over the sleeping sorcerer. There is a caption to the left of the demon which reads “hichezero de sueño” [sorcerer of sleep]. The sorcerer in the middle of the image is depicted standing in front of a fire. The author explains that these sorcerers can heat up cauldrons with fire and add items into it to conjure demons, which is why there is a demon depicted in the fire. The caption beside this sorcerer reads “hichezero de fuego” [sorcerer of fire]. The illustration at the bottom of the image depicts sorcerers who could suck illnesses out of people. The author explains that he believed these sorcerers to be false and illegitimate. The caption at the very bottom of the image reads “hicheseros falsos” [false sorcerers].
Idolos De Los Ingas Inti Vana Cavri Tanbo Toco
This chapter is dedicated to describing the idols and gods of the Incas. This image depicts the Inca Emperor kneeling before their major deities, uana cauri [Huanacauri], tanbo toco [Tambotoco], and pacari tanbo [Pacaritambo]. Huanacauri is a mountain and Pacaritambo is a cave where the first Incas allegedly originated from. The Tambotoco were three niches in the cave. The three niches are depicted at the base of Huanacauri. The author explains that when the Inca is crowned as king, he must honour the deities and make sacrifices to them, which is what this image depicts. His wife and child are standing behind him to help perform the sacrifices to honour the idols. There is a sun, moon and star illustrated at the top of the image, which the Incas also venerated. The words “en el cuzco” are written at the bottom of the image which translates to “in Cusco.”
Idolos I Vacas De Los Andi Svios
This chapter is dedicated to describing the idols and gods of the Incas. This image depicts the Inca king and the other indigenous people of the Antisuyo region of Peru making a sacrifice to an otoronco [jaguar]. The jaguar is depicted on the left side of the image. They are also honouring the two mountain peaks illustrated in the background. The mountain peaks are labelled as saua ciray [Sauasiray] and pitu ciray [Pitociray]. There is a caption at the bottom of the image that reads “en la montana del antisuyo, ” which translates to “in the Antisuyo mountain.”
Idolos I Vacas De Los Chinchai Svivs
This chapter is dedicated to describing the idols and gods of the Incas. This image depicts the Inca king performing a sacrifice of a young child to the deity Pachacamac. Pachacamac is depicted in the top left corner of the image looking down to the Inca. There is a fire burning below the deity which is being used to sacrifice the child. There is a woman standing behind the Inca holding a plate of food, which was also sacrificed to the deity. The word Pachacamac is written beside the deity to identify it. The words “en Paria Caca” are written at the bottom of the image to identify where this image is taking place, which is in Pariacaca.
Idolos I Vacas De Los Colla Svios
This chapter is dedicated to describing the idols and gods of the Incas. This image depicts the indigenous people of the Collasuyo region in Peru making sacrifices to their local huaca [deity]. The two men standing on the right side of the image are depicted offering their sacrifices to the deity. One man is illustrated offering a llama. There is a caption on the llama which reads “carnero negro” [black llama]. The second man is depicted offering what appears to be coco pods. The deity on the left side of the image is illustrated being in a niche on a mountain in the form of a human. The author does not explicitly say the name of this deity.
Idolos I Vacas De Los Conde Svios
This chapter is dedicated to describing the idols and gods of the Incas. This image depicts the indigenous people of the Condesuyo region in Peru making a sacrifice to their local huaca [deity]. Their deity is depicted on top of the volcano on the left side of the image. The volcano is labeled as coropona [Coropuna]. The people at the base of the volcano are offering their sacrifices to the deity. The kneeling man is offering a twelve-year-old child as his sacrifice, while the person beside him is offering what appears to be a small animal. The caption at the bottom of the image reads “en los condes” [in Condesuyo].
Ivlio Chacra Ricvi Chacra Cvnacvi Chava Varqvm Quilla
This chapter is dedicated to discussing the traditions and rituals of each month during the Inca Empire. The Incas tracked the months and years through the stars and their months consisted of thirty days. This image depicts the month of July. During the month of July, agricultural lands were inspected in order to be distributed amongst the Inca Empire. The author explains that llamas and guinea pigs were burned in a public square as a sacrifice to the sun and rains so that their crops would not get damaged. This was the month that farmers would sow their crops. This image depicts the sacrifice of llamas and guinea pigs. There is one man sitting on the left side of the image and another man standing on the right side of the image. They appear to be keeping the fire lit for their sacrifices. The sun is depicted shining through the smoke of the fire. The caption on the image reads “ualla uiza pontifize sacreficio,” which translates to “priest sorcerer pontiff, sacrifice.”
Ivnio Havcai Cvsqvi
This chapter is dedicated to discussing the traditions and rituals of each month during the Inca Empire. The Incas tracked the months and years through the stars and their months consisted of thirty days. This image depicts the month of June, which was dedicated to celebrating the Sun festival called Inti Raymi by performing many child sacrifices. The Incas did this to rest from the previous harvesting months. The image depicts the Inca Emperor drinking while looking at the Sun for the Sun festival. There is a woman sitting on the ground as she pours a drink from a pot. The Sun is illustrated in the top right-hand corner of the image. There is a flying creature depicted in the sky as it brings a drink towards the Sun. The caption at the bottom of the image reads “ueue con el sol en la fiesta del sol,” which translates to “drink with the Sun at the Sun festival.”
La Cvarta Coia Chinbo Mama Iachi Vrma
This illustration depicts Mama Yachiy Urma, the fourth Coya [Queen] of the Inca Empire. She was married to the king, Mayta Capac Inca. She is depicted in the centre of the image walking with two other women. The author explains that she enjoyed going out to converse and walk with other women. The words “Reyno hasta Charca” is written at the bottom of the image, which translates to “He reigned to Charca.” This is referring to her husband, who reigned the regions up to the region of Charca.
La Dezima Coia Mama Ocllo
This illustration depicts Mama Ocllo, the tenth Coya [Queen] of the Inca Empire. She was married to her younger brother, Topa Inca Yupanqui, the tenth king of the Inca Empire. Mama Ocllo is depicted standing in the centre of the image wearing traditional royal garb. She is surrounded by servants with one of them shading her with leaves. The words “Reynó Guanoco, Guayllas, Atapillo” which translates to “He reigned to Guanoco, Guayllas, Atapillo.” These are the regions that her and her husband reigned over.

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