Latin American Chronicles

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La Dozena Coia Chvqvi Llanto
This illustration depicts Chuqui Llanto, the twelfth Coya [Queen] of the Inca Empire. She was married to her brother, Huascar, the twelfth king of the Inca Empire. The author explains that she was known for being a beautiful woman and for raising birds, which is why there is a bird depicted in the image. The queen is illustrated sitting with her hands interlocked as she is being fanned by a servant. The words “Comenso a rreynar y murio” which translated to “She began to rule and she died.” The author says that this queen died when she died at the age of fifty-nine.
La Novena Coia Mama Ana Varqve
This illustration depicts Mama Anawarkhi, the ninth Coya [Queen] of the Inca Empire. She was married to Pachacuti Inca, the ninth king of the Inca Empire. She is depicted standing in the centre of the image wearing traditional garb with an embroidered belt and embroidery at the bottom of her skirt. The author explains that she was an obedient wife to her husband and died at the age of 80. The words “Reynó hasta Chile, hasta Tarma, Chinchay Cocha” are written at the bottom of the image which translates to “He reigned to Chile, Tarma, Chinchayqucha.” These are the regions that her and her husband reigned over.
La Onzena Coia Rava Ocllo
This image depicts Rawa Ocllo, the eleventh Coya [Queen] of the Inca Empire. She was married to her brother, Huayna Capac, the eleventh Inca king. The author describes her to be an incredibly beautiful woman who was charitable towards the poor and sick. She is illustrated kneeling in the centre of the image as her hair is being combed and washed by two female servants. The servant on the left side of the image is also depicted holding a fan of leaves over her head for shade. The words “Reyno Quito, Cayanbi, Guanca Bilca, Canari, Chachapoya” are written at the bottom of the image which describes the cities that this king and queen reigned over.
La Otava Coia Mama Ivinto Caian
This illustration depicts Mama Runtocaya, the eighth queen to the Inca kings of the Inca Empire. She was married to Viracocha Inca, the eighth king of the Inca Empire. She is depicted standing in the centre of the image wearing traditional garbs that are embroidered on the sleeves and at the bottom of the skirt. There are two other people in the image, possibly two of her many children. The author explains that this queen enjoyed raising crocodiles. The words “Reynó Lima, Xauxa, Chinchay Cocha” are written at the bottom of the image, which translates to “He reigned to Lima, Jauja, Chinchayqucha.” These are the regions that her and her husband reigned over.
La Primera Historia de Las Reinas, Coia Mama Vaco Coia
This illustration depicts Mama Waco, the first Coya [Queen] and wife of the Inca kings. She married her son Manco Capac Inca and she was well respected in their kingdom. The author describes her to be incredibly beautiful and a practicing sorceress. She is depicted sitting in the centre of the image holding a mirror in her left hand with servants surrounding her. A servant on the right side of the image is shading Mama Waco, and the servants on the left side of the image are brushing her hair and tending to her nails. The words “Reyno en el Cuzco” are written at the bottom of the image, which translates to “She ruled in Cusco.”
La Primera Reina I Senora Capac Poma Gvallca
This illustration depicts the first lady of the region of Cinchaysuyu in the Inca Empire. Her name was Capac Huarmi Poma Hualca (also spelled Capac Warmi Poma Wallca). The author explains that this woman was beautiful and governed her region well. She was the wife of Apo Guaman Chaua, second in command of the Inca. She is depicted standing in the centre of the image with what appears to be a flower in her right hand and a small bag in her left.
La Qvinta Coia Chinbo Mama Cava
This illustration depicts Mama Caua, the fifth Coya [Queen] of the Inca Empire. She was married to the Inca king, Capac Yupanqui. The author explains that this queen suffered from heart issues which caused her pain. In this image, she appears to be in pain, which could be from her heart condition. There is another woman in the image who appears to be running to help the queen. The words “Reyno hasta Quichiua Aymara” are written at the bottom of the image which translates to “He reigned to Quechua, Aymara.” Quechua and Aymara are two indigenous languages of Peru and Bolivia.
La Segvnda Coia Chinbo Vrma
This illustration depicts Chinbo Urma, the second Coya [Queen] of the Inca Empire. She was married to her brother, Sinchi Roca. He author explains that this queen was known for being peaceful and having a garden and always holding flowers, which is why she is depicted holding a flower in her hands and surrounded by plants. The words “Reynó hasta Hatun Colla” which translates to “Queen to Hatun Colla.”
La Sesta Coia Cvci Chinbo Mama Micai
This illustration depicts Mama Michay, the sixth Coya [Queen] of the Inca Empire. She was married to the Inca King, Inca Roca. The author describes her to be a beautiful woman. She is depicted in the centre of the image as she holds a drum. There are other people in the image who are depicted playing music with her. The words “Reyno hasta Ande Suyo” are written at the bottom of the image, which translates to “He reigned to Ande Suyo.” This is referring to her husband, who ruled the regions up until Ande Suyo.
La Setima Coia Ipa Vaco Mama Machi
This illustration depicts Ipa Huaco Mama Machi, the seventh Coya [Queen] to the Inca kings. She was married to Yahuar Huacac Inca. She is depicted standing in the centre of the image holding a small bird on her right hand. There is a larger bird at the bottom right hand corner of the image. The author explains that this queen raised birds such as macaws and parrots, which is why there are birds in this image. There is also a small child in the bottom left hand corner of the image, which is one of her many children. The words “Reyno conde suyo parinacocha lucana changa” which translates to “He reigned to Condesuyos, Parinacochas, Lacuna, Changa.” This is referring to her and her husband who ruled these regions.
La Terzera Coia Mama Cora Ocllo
This illustration depicts Mama Cora Ocllo, the third Coya [Queen] of the Inca Empire. She was the sister and wife of Inca king Manco Capac. She is described by the author as being incredibly beautiful and sacred. She is also described as being pregnant and miserable by the author, which is why she is illustrated looking sad in the image as she looks down and is resting her face into her hand. There are two servants on both sides of Mama Cora Ocllo who appear to be putting a veil or fabric over her head. The words “Reyno hasta maras” is written at the bottom of the image which translates to “He reigned to Maras.” This is referring to her husband, who reigned the regions up to the city of Maras, a city north of Cusco.
Maio Hatvn Cvsqvi Aimorai Quilla
This chapter is dedicated to discussing the traditions and rituals of each month during the Inca Empire. The Incas tracked the months and years through the stars and their months consisted of thirty days. This image depicts the month of May, which was dedicated to harvesting crops. The author explains that the abundance of crops and harvesting provided them with an abundance of food. This image depicts a crowd of people with bags over their shoulders and on their backs as they carry their harvest to storehouses. The author also explains that inspections were done during this month and the people had to give accurate accounts of their crops and food. The person depicted standing above the crowd with a stick in his hand could possibly be the inspector. The caption at the bottom of the image reads “lleuan al depócito las comidas,” which translates to “meals are taken to the storehouses.”

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